Back To Work Boot Camp (Thursday October 18, 2012 – Baltimore Maryland)

September 25, 2012






America Works Veteran’s Newsletter Issue #1

August 15, 2012



August 15, 2012

America Works  is proud to be an Employment Network with the U.S. Social Security Administration’s Ticket-To-Work Program. If you are under 65 years of age and are receiving SSI/SSDI and would like to go back to work, we may be able to help you find a job. We specialize in helping beneficiaries find full time employment (jobs that range between 35-40 hrs a week).

Here are our Ticket-To-Work Sites:

1. New York City – Call Matthew Silverstein at (212)599-5627 X.154 or email him at

Note: Orientation in held every Friday’s at 2pm at 228 East 45th Street NY, NY 10017. Please bring a resume, SS Card and Picture ID

2. Baltimore – Call (410)625-9675 or email Director Marsha Netus at

3. Washington D.C. – Call (202)466-5627 and ask for Director Jennifer Tiller (

4. Albany, NY – Call (518)465-5627 and ask for Director Sheilah Rourke  (

5. Newark, NJ – Call (862)267-3388 and ask for Director Anila Naqvi (

For more information please visit our website at


Veterans Employment Program

December 4, 2009

Why We Do What We Do

October 15, 2009

Simply put, America Works of New York, Inc. is a company with a conscience. When you read this story, we hope you’ll agree.

Although we’re essentially an employment agency, we’re a very specialized one. We call on private-sector employers to help lift people from poverty into independence.

Working with governments as well as faith- and community-based organizations (FCBOs), we place “hard-to-serve” people such as welfare recipients, homeless veterans, and former criminal offenders into the job market. Over our 25-year history, we estimate that we’ve found jobs for about 175,000 people in cities such as New York and Albany, N.Y.; Newark, N.J.; Baltimore, MD; and Oakland, CA.

Seeing the smiles on our clients’ faces when they gain employment is truly priceless. Believe us when we say that it never gets old.

But we don’t always know what brings people to our doorstep. That’s why we were especially moved by the letter we received yesterday from one of our clients. We hope you’ll see why we’re so committed to our mission.

To see more feedback from our clients, click on the Testimonials tab above.


To Whom It May Concern,

My name is XXX XXX and here is my story.

In December ’08, I lost my fiancée due to a fatal car accident and in January ’09, I lost my mom due to ovarian cancer which left me with no family living and through all the expenses I ended up homeless and on the streets of Manhattan in May ’09.

Then in June, I answered a job ad in the New York Daily News at America Works…and met with the incredible caring help from Corina and Edi as they enlisted me for this job.

Their caring and great work for me truly started my life off again and now I’m doing great at the job. I now am off the streets and living in a furnished room and starting my life up again and feeling much better about myself.

Thank you again Corina, Edi, and the staff at America Works. You saved my life and gave me a life again.



Has America Abandoned the Concept of Rehabilitation?

August 3, 2009

New Research Shows A Record Number of “Lifers” in Prisons

It seems that the U.S. has abandoned the concept of rehabilitating criminal offenders. Instead, states are throwing away the book by enacting tough mandatory minimum sentencing laws. To make matters worse, parole boards are apparently reluctant to grant parole even to those who are eligible.

A recent article in The New York Times highlights this situation by noting that there are more prisoners serving life sentences in the U.S. than ever before. There are reportedly 140,610 lifers amongst America’s 2.3 million prison inmates, according to the Sentencing Project, up from 34,000 in 1984.

That’s a 6,664.706 % increase in only 25 years!

The states with the most lifers are California, Alabama, Massachusetts, Nevada, and New York. California’s prison system, the largest in the nation with 170,000 inmates, has 34,164 lifers alone.

It seems that the goal of incarceration in this country is no longer rehabilitation but “lifetime isolation and incapacitation,” according to one person quoted in the article.

Although those who’ve received life terms are generally violent criminals, this is indicative of the way America now deals with all of its offenders. Even non-violent offenders can be hit with “three strikes” sentences that incarcerate them for decades.

There are ways to cope with offenders, particularly those convicted of non-violent and drug-related offenses, that will minimize the negative impact on communities while decreasing the massive expense of locking up everyone. Community supervision is an option that is too often overlooked.

New York State spends $44,000 annually to incarcerate each offender compared to a fraction of that to supervise an offender in the community on probation or parole. The cost is even higher in New York City – a whopping $59,900 to jail an offender for one year.

America Works believes that the best way to break the cycle of recidivism is to prepare ex-offenders for employment, then give them the tools they need to become self-sufficient.

Over the past nine years, we have placed approximately 20,000 ex-offenders in jobs in New York City. When newly released prisoners are referred to us, we provide them with targeted training as well as a resume, appropriate clothing, and car fare, then arrange for job interviews.

In Newark, N.J., where a similar program has been under way for just over 12 months, the recidivism rate for our participants is 2.5%. That’s a small fraction of the state-wide average of 51%, according to the “Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative (SVORI) Final Report” by the Rutgers University School of Criminal Justice.

Job placement programs such as this one actually benefit the state, the county, and the city. Moving ex-offenders into employment decreases the burden on expensive state programs such as welfare and food stamps while simultaneously increasing income tax revenues. But it has social benefits that aren’t easily quantified such as keeping families together and providing better nutrition to children – benefits that are easy to believe in.

America Works Receives New Department of Labor Grant to Aid Homeless Veterans

July 1, 2009

Chief Executive Officer Dr. Lee Bowes and Founder Peter Cove of America WorksDid you know there are more than one-quarter of a million U.S. military veterans living in New York City?

That’s right. Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s Office of Veterans Affairs (MOVA) estimates that there are about 240,000 U.S. veterans in the five boroughs of NYC.

And while MOVA doesn’t track how many of those men and women are homeless or living in shelters, anecdotal evidence leads us to believe it’s a significant number.

That’s why we’re pleased to announce that one of our affiliated companies has received a grant under the U.S. Department of Labor’s Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program (HVRP) to provide NYC’s homeless veterans with job training and placement.

The purpose of HVRP is to reintegrate homeless veterans into the workforce while addressing the complex problems they face. Grants were made to a variety of state and local organizations nationwide. HVRP was initially authorized in July 1987, and was re-authorized under the Homeless Veterans Comprehensive Assistance Act of 2001. For more details about the program, please click here:

This will actually be the second program that America Works is going to offer local veterans. Since January 2009, we’ve operated a pilot program specifically for U.S. veterans who receive food stamps. We operate under contract with funding from MOVA and the NYC Human Resources Administration.

In case you’re not familiar with our mission, let us explain. America Works of New York, Inc. is a Manhattan-based company with a conscience. Founded 25 years ago by social entrepreneur Peter Cove, it provides intensive, personalized employment services to hard-to-place populations including the homeless, criminal offenders, and welfare and food stamp recipients. Our chief executive officer is Dr. Lee Bowes.